LOG
Kyle May and Scott Abrahams
LOG
LOG inverts the typical earthly foundation of a lightweight structure, which is in the ground, and actually places the foundation above the structure. In a place of religious reflection, a foundation from above has a special meaning. The cedar LOG used is an object of contemplation in and of itself, as cedar is mentioned 76 times in the Bible. Without the heavenly foundation, the fragile glass walls would not stand. The log becomes a surprising exaggeration in scale of the typical s’chach roof found in a Sukkah. The laminated glass walls allow the inhabitants of this Sukkah to peer out into the earthly world from which they are part of, while still being separate from such world for the duration of this celebration. Inside the glass walls one finds two simplistic gestures: a table and a candle - the essential programmatic devices. The table provides a place for the recital of the blessings and communal feasting, and the candle provides light to the inhabitants. Neither device touches the ground, but are suspended from the LOG, and are positioned to create a zone of programmatic intensity, within a very simplistic and poetic structure. The log provides minimal protection from sunlight, changes the way the space is used during the day by the area the shadow is cast, and focuses the inhabitants view upwards at night, towards the heavens.

More Sukkahs