Pallet City
Tyler Barker, Andrew Fu, Wei-Yen Hsieh, Kai Fukunaga, Vincent Ahn, Shuping Liu, Tito S
Pallet City
Traditionally, a Sukkah offered the Jewish culture a sense of home and belonging during the Diaspora—a time of exile. It acted as a bridge that transcends the boundaries of physical separation from home and connects one with their family, past, and culture.

We believe that the significance of the Sukkah and its role in the Jewish community can be expanded into a much broader context in today’s global society, taking into account the location of the Sukkah City in the city of New York. With the accelerating pace of globalization, New York has become one of the prime capitals for massive influx of people, goods and information. With our Sukkah, we wished to explore and capitalize upon the idea of the “global culture” and the contradicting sense of fragmentation that is often brought about. As a means to reconcile this conflict, we decided to utilize shipping pallets as the principal material. A pallet presents a powerful advantage of being a ubiquitous material. It is the base on which much of the economic activity in New York sits; it travels and is used all over the world; it is an iconic element in today’s society that is easily recognized by people of all culture, social status, and race. By constructing our Sukkah with pallets, we are celebrating the material’s diversity and pervasiveness within the global culture, creating a structure that will bring together people of different cultures and backgrounds.

More Sukkahs